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Global Views on Trends for Fashion, Accessories, Interiors and more for the aspiring and passionate online trend-setting community. From Sydney with Love.

NOIR . NOIR . NOIR . NOIR . NOIR

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Icon Trend | Street Style | Jamie Bochert
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Icon Trend |  Miu Miu | A/W 2016/17 
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Icon Trend |  Miu Miu | A/W 2016/17 
Icon Trend | Street Style | Vanessa Hong
Icon Trend | Street Style | Yoyo Cao - Photo by Nabile Quenum - Paris Fashion Week Fall2016 
Icon Trend | SAINT LAURENT | SAC DE JOUR, EMBOSSED CROC
Icon Trend |  Miu Miu | A/W 2016/17 
Icon Trend |  Miu Miu | A/W 2016/17
Icon Trend | Global Views on Trends

Chanel - The Making of a Famous Bag

CHANEL bag 2.55
The secrets of the Handbag
An exclusive insight of the making of the infamous CHANEL 2.55

In 1929 Mademoiselle Chanel was the first to introduce an elegant version of the shoulder bag. It did already exist, in the form of a large pouch with a wide strap, but was only used by members of the military. Women discovered, to their delight, that by using a thin strap they could walk around with their hands free. A new fashion was born. From then on, Mademoiselle Chanel constantly used this idea, until she eventually created the bag commonly known as the “2.55” (which is in fact its “date of birth”) in February 1955. The manufacturing of the bag takes 180 essential operations, and requires a level of precision and craftsmanship, which is outstanding. More from the fabulous Trendland (Chanel press release)
CHANEL bag 2.55 
CHANEL bag 2.55
CHANEL bag 2.55

CHANEL bag 2.55
CHANEL bag 2.55
CHANEL bag 2.55
CHANEL bag 2.55
CHANEL bag 2.55
CHANEL bag 2.55
CHANEL bag 2.55

Accessories & Looks | Black is the new Black | It's in the Details

Icon Trend | Black is the new Black | Trending in Accessories
Icon Trend | Black is the new Black | Trending in Accessories | Ann Demeulemeester SS 2016 
Icon Trend | Black is the new Black | Trending in Accessories | Neck Detail 
Icon Trend | Black is the new Black | Trending in Accessories | Rodarte AW 2016 
Icon Trend | Black is the new Black | Trending in Accessories | Stella McCartney 
Icon Trend | Black is the new Black | Trending in Accessories | Vera Wang Spring 2016
Icon Trend | Black is the new Black | Trending in Accessories | VALENTINO Feather leather cuff

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Icon Trend | Global Views on Fashion Trends

1.  Roberta Buntal Hat by Benoit Missolin via Valery Demure.   2.  Balenciaga studs gold bracelet in black.   3.  Le sac minaudière Cuff de Perrin Paris.   4.  Chanel’s classic bag in black gold with a double strap.   5. A pair of onyx and diamonds ear pendants @ Christies.   6.  Majestic black palm belt made by Sophia 203 via Valery Demure.  7.  Roger Vivier booties. 

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Icon Trend | Valentino Fall 2015 Couture 
Icon Trend | Erickson Beamon
Icon Trend | Valentino Spring 2016 
Icon Trend | Valentino Spring 2016 | Gold Tatoo 
Icon Trend | Valentino Spring 2016 
Icon Trend | Vintage 1970s 
Icon Trend | Haider Ackermann | Spring 2014
Icon Trend | Christian Dior boots - A/W 2015/16
Icon Trend | ALEXANDER MCQUEEN AW 2016/17  
Icon Trend | Paris Fashion Week SS 2015 | Elena
Icon Trend | RENÈ CAOVILLA SUEDE & SWAROVSKI ANKLE BOOTS
Icon Trend | Louboutin - the First Evening Backpack 
Icon Trend | Le sac minaudière Cuff de Perrin Paris
Icon Trend | BALMAIN ALIENOR BOOTS
Icon Trend | Vintage ALEXANDER MCQUEEN jacket with golden Tiger embroidery 

The Luxury Syndrome - Is the chinese luxury market actually the embodiment of social injustice and corruption?



Excerpt
China’s Booming Luxury Consumption Linked to Corruption
Read more here Epoch Times

China is still a poor country from its average income. However, its luxury consumption has become number two in the world! This is just an indication of the polarization in the distribution of income. The wealth is in the hand of a small portion of the population. They have too much money, and then they buy luxury goods. [….] In China, the luxury market is a special industry. It is actually the embodiment of social injustice and corruption. Read more The Epoch Times 

China’s GDP ranks 105th in the world and according to its Ministry of Commerce, 150 million Chinese earn less that US$1 per day, the United Nations standard for poverty. Yet, China is the second largest market for luxury goods in the world. While the luxury markets in Europe, North America, and Japan are shrinking in the global economic downturn, China’s consumption of luxury goods is on the rise, amounting to $10.7 billion or 25 percent of the global luxury market. 
Wang Ning, a professor of sociology at Sun Yat-Sen University in Guangdong Province told Sound of Hope Radio that he sees China’s luxury consumption as part of a black market, because the sources of the income used for such purchases are not transparent and do not come from legal sources. 

Associate professor Jiang Caifen at Guangzhou University School of Economics conducted an in-depth study of luxury consumers to see who was buying luxury goods. “According to my observations, there are three types of luxury consumers: those who became super rich super fast, social elites including those white-collar workers at foreign owned enterprises, and the government officials,” he said. 

Luxury goods have become indicators for social problems. The source of the problem is not the luxury goods, but the society itself, wrote Zhou Ting, director of Luxury Goods Research Center at the University of International Business and Economy, in an article titled “Luxury Syndrome” in a recent edition of China Weekly. “In China, there are too many people who are second-generation nouveau riche, too many people whose parents became rich through political power, too many people like Guo Meimei [a 20-year-old who flaunted wealth that may have come from corruption in China’s Red Cross], too many people who became rich overnight through unregulated coal mining and oil drilling. All these people are eager to use luxury goods to prove their identity,” wrote Zhou. 

Gifts and Bribes

A report from McKinsey & Company, a global management and consulting firm, said 50 percent of luxury goods purchased in China in 2009 were gifts. “The popular gifts in the business world are Vacheron-Constantin watches, Louis Vuitton handbags, Ermenegildo Zegna ties, and such,” said professor Jiang in the interview with Guangzhou Daily. 

In the Chinese power cycle, one’s authority is evaluated by the gifts one receives, the sociologist Wang told Guangzhou Daily. “Louis Vuitton is the most recognizable luxury brand in China and thus becomes the symbol of authority.” 

In China, if one wants to climb the corporate ladder, one must kowtow to one’s supervisor. If one wants to do business, one must have support from state officials. Businesses bribing state officials and businesses conspiring with officials have become very common. Read more The Epoch Times

Icon Trend | Trending | Grey Shades & Silver a la Courrèges

ICON TREND | GLOBAL TRENDS ON FASHION AND ACCESSORIES
1.  Chanel’s Boy-Bag in lizard chevron pattern.   2.  Necklace by Schield   3.  Givenchy Shark Lock handbag.   4.  Louis Vuitton Ttote with pyramid studs.   5.  Vintage Hermes Birkin 35 Club Etain Lizard in graphite.   6.  Victoria Beckham handbag.   7.  Maison Margiela exaggerated heel pumps.
Icon Trend | Alasdair F/W 2015
Icon Trend | F/W 2016 Valentino



Icon Trend | Luisavia Roma
Icon Trend | Chanel Silver Boy Bag | Fall 2016
Icon Trend | Trending Silver
Icon Trend | F/W 2016 Louis Vuitton
Icon Trend | TRUSSARDI F/W 2016 
Icon Trend | LOEWE A/W 2016/17
Icon Trend | Trending Silver Shoes 
Icon Trend | F/W 2016 Louis Vuitton
Icon Trend | TRUSSARDI F/W 2015-2016 
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